My Cart (0)
Free USA Shipping On Orders Over $49  •   No Hidden Charges   •  No Surprises!  •   30 Day Money Back Returns*   •  FREE Warranty*

18K Gold Jewish Star Of David Magen David With Chai Pendant

jewelrybynet

Item # UTS-R5029-90607-P
View More Images

More Views

  • jewelrybynet
Luxury For Less, Buy Direct & Save!
Retail Price: $650.00

Regular Price: $380.00

Easter Sale Price
1 Week Only
$299.00

You Save $351.00 !

Availability:
Usually Ships in 3 to 5 Business Days

Quantity:
Add To Cart

Item # UTS-R5029-90607-P

View Customer Reviews

Ask A Question About This Item

FREE USA Shipping Over $49
Flat Fee International $5.99
No Hidden Charges!
No Surprises!
N0 Sales Tax!
Except NY
30 Day Return Policy *

Quick Overview

18K Gold Jewish Star Of David Magen David With Chai Pendant

18K Yellow Gold Jewish Star Of David (Magen David) With Chai Pendant

Invest in fine gold, silver and diamond jewelry at an affordable price when you shop at JewelryByNet.com.

Enhance your religious jewelry collection with the classic look of this stunning 18K Yellow Gold Jewish Star Of David (Magen David) With Chai Pendant. A timeless piece of unsurpassed quality, this exquisite religious charm pendant will be a welcome addition to any jewelry collection and makes a perfect gift at a price you can afford.

Jewelry Technical Details:

Metal Type: 18K Yellow Gold
Dimensions: 14MM x 19MM
Finish: Polished

Judaica Jewish Kabbalah Star Of David Pendant

Background Information:

Magen David

The Magen David (shield of David, or as it is more commonly known, the Star of David) is the symbol most commonly associated with Judaism today, but it is actually a relatively new Jewish symbol. It is supposed to represent the shape of King David's shield (or perhaps the emblem on it), but there is really no support for that claim in any early rabbinic literature. In fact, the symbol is so rare in early Jewish literature and artwork that art dealers suspect forgery if they find the symbol in early Jewish works.

Scholars such as Franz Rosenzweig have attributed deep theological significance to the symbol. For example, some note that the top triangle strives upward, toward G-d, while the lower triangle strives downward, toward the real world. Some note that the intertwining makes the triangles inseparable, like the Jewish people. Some say that the three sides represent the three types of Jews: Kohanim, Levites and Israel. Some note that there are actually 12 sides (3 exterior and 3 interior on each triangle), representing the 12 tribes. While these theories are theologically interesting, they have little basis in historical fact.

The symbol of intertwined equilateral triangles is a common one in the Middle East and North Africa, and is thought to bring good luck. It appears occasionally in early Jewish artwork, but never as an exclusively Jewish symbol. The nearest thing to an "official" Jewish symbol at the time was the menorah.

In the middle ages, Jews often were required to wear badges to identify themselves as Jews, much as they were in Nazi Germany, but these Jewish badges were not always the familiar Magen David. For example, a fifteenth century painting by Nuno Goncalves features a rabbi wearing a six-pointed badge that looks more or less like an asterisk.

In the 17th century, it became a popular practice to put Magen Davids on the outside of synagogues, to identify them as Jewish houses of worship in much the same way that a cross identified a Christian house of worship; however, I have never seen any explanation of why this symbol was chosen, rather than some other symbol.

The Magen David gained popularity as a symbol of Judaism when it was adopted as the emblem of the Zionist movement in 1897, but the symbol continued to be controversial for many years afterward. When the modern state of Israel was founded, there was much debate over whether this symbol should be used on the flag.

Today, the Magen David is a universally recognized symbol of Jewry. It appears on the flag of the state of Israel, and the Israeli equivalent of the Red Cross is known as the Red Magen David.

The Star of David

The Star of David in the oldest surviving complete copy of the Masoretic text, the Leningrad Codex, dated 1008.The Shield of David or Magen David in Hebrew, with nikkud or without, pronounced Mahgayn Daveed in Modern Hebrew and Mogein Dovid or Mogen Dovid in Ashkenazi Hebrew and Yiddish is a generally recognized symbol of Jewish Community and Judaism. It is named after King David of ancient Israel; and its usage began in the Middle Ages, alongside the more ancient symbol of the menorah.

With the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 the Star of David on the Flag of Israel has also become a symbol of Israel.

As a Jewish symbol

According to some Judaic sources, the Star/Shield of David signifies the number seven: that is, the six points plus the center. The earliest extant Jewish text to mention it is the Eshkol Ha-Kofer by a Karaite named Judah Hadassi, from the 12th century CE:

"Seven names of angels precede the mezuzah: Michael, Gabriel, etc. ... Tetragrammaton protect you! And likewise the sign, called the 'Shield of David', is placed beside the name of each angel."

The number seven has religious significance in Judaism, e.g., the six days of Creation plus the seventh day of rest, the six working days in the week plus Shabbat, the Seven Spirits of God, as well as the Menorah in the ancient Temple, whose seven oil lamps rest on three stems branching from each side of a central pole. And so on. Perhaps, the Star of David came to be used as a standard symbol in synagogues because its organization into 3+3+1 corresponds to the Temple's Menorah, which was the more traditional symbol for Judaism in ancient times.

Exact origins of the symbol's relation to Jewish identity are unknown. Several theories were put forward. According to one hypothesis, Star of David comprises two of the three letters in the name David. In its Hebrew spelling, it contains only three characters, two of which are "D" (or "Dalet", in Hebrew). In ancient times, this letter was written in a form much like a triangle, similar to the Greek letter Delta (?), with which it shares a sound and the same (4th) position in their respective alphabets, as it does with English. The symbol may have been a simple family crest formed by flipping and juxtaposing the two most prominent letters in the name.

Some researchers have theorized that the hexagram represents the astrological chart at the time of David's birth or anointment as king. The hexagram is also known as the "King's Star" in astrological circles, and was an important astrological symbol in Zoroastrianism.

The earliest archaeological evidence for the Jewish use of the symbol comes from an inscription attributed to Joshua ben Asayahu in late 7th century BCE Sidon.

"Practical" Kabbalah makes use of this sign, arranging the Ten Sephiroth (sefirot, spheres) in it, and placing it on amulets. However, the sign is nowhere to be found in classical kabbalistic texts themselves, such as the Zohar and the like. Therefore, its use as a sefirotic diagram in amulets is more likely a reinterpretation of a preexisting magical symbol. According to G.S. Oegema,

"Isaac Luria provided the Shield of David with a further mystical meaning. In his book "Etz Hachayim" he teaches that the elements of the plate for the Seder evening have to be placed in the order of the hexagram: above the three sefirot "Crown", "Wisdom", and "Insight", below the other seven".

M. Costa wrote that M. Gudemann and other researchers in the 1920s claimed that Isaac Luria influenced the becoming of the Star of David a national Jewish emblem by teaching that the elements of the plate for the Seder evening have to be placed in the order of the hexagram, but Gershom Scholem proved that Isaac Luria talked about parallel triangles one beneath the other and not about the hexagram.

Kabbalistically, the Star/Shield of David symbolizes the six directions of space plus the center, under the influence of the description of space found in the Sefer Yetsira: Up, Down, East, West, South, North, and Center. Congruently, under the influence of the Zohar, it represents the Six Sefirot of the Male (Zeir Anpin) united with the Seventh Sefirot of the Female (Nekuva).

A popular folk etymology has it that the Star of David is literally modeled after the shield of the young Israelite warrior David (later to be King David). In order to save metal, the shield was not made of metal but of leather spanned across the simplest metal frame that would hold the round shield: two interlocking triangles. No reliable historical evidence for this etymology exists.

Shield form

The Shield of David is not mentioned in ancient rabbinic literature. Notably, not a single archaeological proof exists concerning the use of this symbol in the Land of Israel during BCE. Scientists say that it probably was not a widely recognized symbol in the Israel of the Second Temple era. A supposed David's shield however has recently been noted on a Jewish tombstone at Taranto, in Southern Italy, which may date as early as the third century CE. Likewise, a stone bearing the shield from the arch of a 3-4th century synagogue in the Galilee was found.

The earliest Jewish literary source which mentions the "Shield of David" is the Eshkol Ha-Kofer by Judah Hadassi from the middle of the 12th century CE, where seven Shields are used in an amulet for a mezuzah. It appears to have been in use as part of amulets before it was in use in formal Jewish contexts.

A manuscript Tanakh dated 1307 and belonging to Rabbi Yosef bar Yehuda ben Marvas from Toledo, Spain, was decorated with a Shield of David.

In the synagogues, perhaps, it was associated with the mezuzah. Originally, the hexagram may have been employed as an architectural ornament on synagogues, as it is, for example, on the cathedrals of Brandenburg and Stendal, and on the Marktkirche at Hanover. A pentagram in this form is found on the ancient synagogue at Tell Hum.

Keywords: gold, charm, pendant, Judaica, Jewish, Hebrew, Kabbalah, Jews, Judaism, Star, Symbols, Numerology, David, Magen, Shield, chai, life, mizpah, torah, lchaim, tolife, medal, religious, religion, hamsa, bar, mitzvah, bat, Ketubah, Mezuzah, Ani l'Dodi, ayala, Shofar, Tallit, kippot, Mahgayn, Daveed, Mogein, Dovid, Mogen, Zionist

All of our jewelry is made from the finest material available. All of our gold and silver jewelry is 100% Pure Solid, NOT plated, and is stamped to indicate that the item is genuine.

JewelryByNet.com is now recognized as the online jewelry expert. Combining the Lowest Prices in the USA, high quality gems and jewelry, fine service, exceptional customer service, and expert advice, JewelryByNet.com has successfully served thousands of customers. We're confident we will satisfy you as well.

JewelryByNet offers only timeless classic designs. The jewelry you select will always be in style, making it ideal for gift giving. To ensure your selection is of the highest quality, all JewelryByNet jewelry goes through over 20 painstaking quality control tests in the manufacturing process, and is inspected again by our laboratory before getting a thorough going-over as your special jewelry item is packaged & shipped to you.

All measurements are approximate and may vary slightly from the listed dimensions. T.W. (total weight) is approximate. For Example: 1/2 carat T.W. may be .45 to .58 carat, 1 carat T.W. may be .95 to 1.10 carat. All JewelryByNet.com Sterling Silver jewelry is Anti-Tarnish. Product Images are not actual size.

Note: Due to the daily fluctuation of the market price of precious gems and metals, our pricing and availability on items are subject to change. Items in your Shopping Cart will reflect the most recent price.

Additional Information
Product Dimensions Used:
WIDTH/WIDE: Measured from left to right
HEIGHT/HIGH/LONG: Measured from top to bottom
Chain Style N/A
Metal Type N/A
Stone N/A
Birthstone N/A

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

Terms

 
Important Jewelry Terms & Conditions For This Item

This Item qualifies for our standard 30 day Return Policy.


 

 
Ask A Question About This Product / Report an Error

 

 

JewelryByNET.com Ask A Question

 

 

Product Tags
 


  

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

All measurements are approximate and may vary slightly from the listed dimensions. T.W. (total weight) is approximate. For Example: 1/2 carat T.W. may be .45 to .58 carat, 1 carat T.W. may be .95 to 1.10 carat. JewelryByNET.com is not responsible for typographical errors. Images represent style only and are not actual size. Product Images are not actual size. Please read the size specifications displayed with the product.

Note: Due to the daily fluctuation of the market price of precious gems and metals, our pricing and availability on items are subject to change without notice. Items in your Shopping Cart will reflect the most recent price.

Our Best Sellers
  Safe Shopping
 •  Legal Notice
 •  Return Policy
 •  View Reviews



JEWELRYBYNET.COM CELEBRATING 15 YEARS DELIVERING HIGH QUALITY JEWELRY AT AFFORDABLE PRICES WORLDWIDE
  Helpful Links
 •  Contact Us
 •  About
 •  View Reviews

  My Info
 •  My Account
 •  My Cart
 •  My Wish List
 •  Sign In
 •  FAQ
 •  Terms
Jewelrybynet Reviews
Is Jewelrybynet.com a Legit Site?
Is Jewelrybynet.com Safe?

JewelryByNET Accepts Visa MasterCard Discover AMEX Google Checkout Google Wallet PayPal Payments